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read this one

Re: read this one

Postby Galey » 13 Oct 2015, 21:34

When all else fails let's bombard the papers with letters about bicycle registration as a distraction. :evilgrin:
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Re: read this one

Postby Kingo » 13 Oct 2015, 21:39

laneends wrote:
Hvalross wrote:
Agree, and agree it won't go away........but, like guns, and I don't own any, but here folks are required to show ability or need to get a gun licence, then and only then can they purchase.......certain classes of firearm are forbidden........Its the structural model and the oversight that could be adopted for cars boats and jet skis should be in the class of Machine guns and Automatics.........forbidden!

Oops!

IMHO


Its when the sales of railbaza gun mount accessory soar you ought to worry :o
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Thats one way to take care of all the jetskis :up:
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Re: read this one

Postby Anthony » 14 Oct 2015, 14:37

I got a Anaconda catalogue in the mail today and noticed these in the kayak section

IMG_0071.jpg


IMG_0069.jpg
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Re: read this one

Postby makro » 14 Oct 2015, 15:56

I have been reading this post and thought I would weigh in as a newbie.

Very new to kayaking (3 months) and vyak has been instrumental in educating me on the safety aspect. Once I decided I needed a yak, I spent tonnes of time reading the safety section to learn what safety gear is needed, what cold/warm weather clothing options were and how folks have rigged their kayaks for fishing. From my experience there is a lot to read in these sections and you just want to get out on the water. Having purchased in winter, helped me spend the time researching what was needed to be safe out on the water.

As a newbie I am finding it difficult to identify when is a good time to go out on the water. Based on reading the various threads I know 20knots is bad, but what is ok? what are the variables? so that I can make an informed decision whether to go out or not. I see many senior members talk about tides, weather changes, wind speed, gusts etc and for me I would love to learn to identify ok/good times to fish, cause that's the reason I got a fishing kayak (albeit a native :evilgrin: ). While the suggestion of having a website sounds great, managing and maintaining the same with up to date accurate information would be a nightmare.

I have been out once in PPB with a couple of members from this forum and it was awesome, calm waters, sun just rising, even caught a few fish (no PBs) and learnt a tonne, swapped tips on setting up milk crates etc etc... and I would love to attend more of these. However, I do understand that there are different levels of yakking experience and as a newbie I am still learning and may slow down more experienced members. Hence what I would love to gain learn is the following:-

1. What are the typical easy spots to start out at?
2. Where to get a reputable forecast information (BOM, Willy weather)
3. What data points do experienced yakers look at before they make a decision to go out
4. How do you decide what times to fish between. I have seen threads where yakkers have got stuck in the mud!
5. When you get to the water what signs do you look for to make a last go/no go decision
6. When you are on the water what are the tell tale signs to call it a day or risk getting into a spot of trouble.

The above would be a great sticky like the safety one with examples/screenshots of considerations

As the last thing I want, is have a yak that's never/hardly been out on the water and at the same time I don't want to be that guy in the news!

Stop rambling.

Cheers
Makro
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Re: read this one

Postby 4liters » 14 Oct 2015, 16:03

Yeah, that sort of stuff condensed into something concise would be good. For example the clothing thread is a great resource but something that lists a few clothing combinations that someone can just go out and buy might be better (and more likely to be read) than a long thread.
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Re: read this one

Postby Hvalross » 14 Oct 2015, 16:54

makro wrote:I have been reading this post and thought I would weigh in as a newbie.

Very new to kayaking (3 months) and vyak has been instrumental in educating me on the safety aspect. Once I decided I needed a yak, I spent tonnes of time reading the safety section to learn what safety gear is needed, what cold/warm weather clothing options were and how folks have rigged their kayaks for fishing. From my experience there is a lot to read in these sections and you just want to get out on the water. Having purchased in winter, helped me spend the time researching what was needed to be safe out on the water.

As a newbie I am finding it difficult to identify when is a good time to go out on the water. Based on reading the various threads I know 20knots is bad, but what is ok? what are the variables? so that I can make an informed decision whether to go out or not. I see many senior members talk about tides, weather changes, wind speed, gusts etc and for me I would love to learn to identify ok/good times to fish, cause that's the reason I got a fishing kayak (albeit a native :evilgrin: ). While the suggestion of having a website sounds great, managing and maintaining the same with up to date accurate information would be a nightmare.

I have been out once in PPB with a couple of members from this forum and it was awesome, calm waters, sun just rising, even caught a few fish (no PBs) and learnt a tonne, swapped tips on setting up milk crates etc etc... and I would love to attend more of these. However, I do understand that there are different levels of yakking experience and as a newbie I am still learning and may slow down more experienced members. Hence what I would love to gain learn is the following:-

1. What are the typical easy spots to start out at?
2. Where to get a reputable forecast information (BOM, Willy weather)
3. What data points do experienced yakers look at before they make a decision to go out
4. How do you decide what times to fish between. I have seen threads where yakkers have got stuck in the mud!
5. When you get to the water what signs do you look for to make a last go/no go decision
6. When you are on the water what are the tell tale signs to call it a day or risk getting into a spot of trouble.

The above would be a great sticky like the safety one with examples/screenshots of considerations

As the last thing I want, is have a yak that's never/hardly been out on the water and at the same time I don't want to be that guy in the news!

Stop rambling.

Cheers
Makro


Well I am also a newbie to yakking but not to boating. Most of your points are knowledge built up over time... but a person needs to overlay the understanding the the yak is less stable and therefore demands a person learns a bunch of new skills.

Yakkers that will talk to you when you make a genuine friendly approach to them will, I have found, also invite you along if they are going to go where they know you are safe....thus its a slow process, because until they have become familiar with you, your gear and how you conduct yourself, they would be daft to take the risk with a person that will put them both at risk.
Watch the forum and turn up to outings that you can get to, and ask if it will be safe for you as a newbie.......dont have to paddle/peddle right on top of folks... be prepared to sit it out and find out when they plan to return and try to be there to learn both ends...the going out and the getting back.

Not sure that there is any quick fix for many of your points ............just based on where I am at.
When all else fails........read the instructions!
Studies have shown that people who have more Birthdays tend to live longer...
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Re: read this one

Postby Hvalross » 14 Oct 2015, 16:55

Hvalross wrote:
makro wrote:I have been reading this post and thought I would weigh in as a newbie.

Very new to kayaking (3 months) and vyak has been instrumental in educating me on the safety aspect. Once I decided I needed a yak, I spent tonnes of time reading the safety section to learn what safety gear is needed, what cold/warm weather clothing options were and how folks have rigged their kayaks for fishing. From my experience there is a lot to read in these sections and you just want to get out on the water. Having purchased in winter, helped me spend the time researching what was needed to be safe out on the water.

As a newbie I am finding it difficult to identify when is a good time to go out on the water. Based on reading the various threads I know 20knots is bad, but what is ok? what are the variables? so that I can make an informed decision whether to go out or not. I see many senior members talk about tides, weather changes, wind speed, gusts etc and for me I would love to learn to identify ok/good times to fish, cause that's the reason I got a fishing kayak (albeit a native :evilgrin: ). While the suggestion of having a website sounds great, managing and maintaining the same with up to date accurate information would be a nightmare.

I have been out once in PPB with a couple of members from this forum and it was awesome, calm waters, sun just rising, even caught a few fish (no PBs) and learnt a tonne, swapped tips on setting up milk crates etc etc... and I would love to attend more of these. However, I do understand that there are different levels of yakking experience and as a newbie I am still learning and may slow down more experienced members. Hence what I would love to gain learn is the following:-

1. What are the typical easy spots to start out at?
2. Where to get a reputable forecast information (BOM, Willy weather)
3. What data points do experienced yakers look at before they make a decision to go out
4. How do you decide what times to fish between. I have seen threads where yakkers have got stuck in the mud!
5. When you get to the water what signs do you look for to make a last go/no go decision
6. When you are on the water what are the tell tale signs to call it a day or risk getting into a spot of trouble.

The above would be a great sticky like the safety one with examples/screenshots of considerations

As the last thing I want, is have a yak that's never/hardly been out on the water and at the same time I don't want to be that guy in the news!

Stop rambling.

Cheers
Makro


Well I am also a newbie to yakking but not to boating. Most of your points are knowledge built up over time... but a person needs to overlay the understanding that the yak is less stable and therefore demands a person learns a bunch of new skills.

Yakkers that will talk to you when you make a genuine friendly approach to them will, I have found, also invite you along if they are going to go where they know you are safe....thus its a slow process, because until they have become familiar with you, your gear and how you conduct yourself, they would be daft to take the risk with a person that will put them both at risk.
Watch the forum and turn up to outings that you can get to, and ask if it will be safe for you as a newbie.......dont have to paddle/peddle right on top of folks... be prepared to sit it out and find out when they plan to return and try to be there to learn both ends...the going out and the getting back.

Not sure that there is any quick fix for many of your points ............just based on where I am at.
When all else fails........read the instructions!
Studies have shown that people who have more Birthdays tend to live longer...
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Re: read this one

Postby laneends » 14 Oct 2015, 17:07

A golden tip. When starting choose your times and location around the forecast. Rather than picking time and pace and wonder if conditions are ok.,eg dont say i think I will go to altona next sat morning, I will keep an eye on the weather. Rather the weather forecast is looking good tommorrow, XYZ pace looks the best thats when and where I will go. If you pick time and place first you will be tempted to go when its not the easiest.

Use the BOM chart and pick less than 5 knots on shore or less than 10 knots off shore, and it should be pretty easy conditions. Then add more variables in as you get experience.

getting stuck in the mud is a northern half of western port issue.
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Re: read this one

Postby Seasherpa » 14 Oct 2015, 18:09

makro wrote:I have been reading this post and thought I would weigh in as a newbie.

Very new to kayaking (3 months) and vyak has been instrumental in educating me on the safety aspect. Once I decided I needed a yak, I spent tonnes of time reading the safety section to learn what safety gear is needed, what cold/warm weather clothing options were and how folks have rigged their kayaks for fishing. From my experience there is a lot to read in these sections and you just want to get out on the water. Having purchased in winter, helped me spend the time researching what was needed to be safe out on the water.

As a newbie I am finding it difficult to identify when is a good time to go out on the water. Based on reading the various threads I know 20knots is bad, but what is ok? what are the variables? so that I can make an informed decision whether to go out or not. I see many senior members talk about tides, weather changes, wind speed, gusts etc and for me I would love to learn to identify ok/good times to fish, cause that's the reason I got a fishing kayak (albeit a native :evilgrin: ). While the suggestion of having a website sounds great, managing and maintaining the same with up to date accurate information would be a nightmare.

I have been out once in PPB with a couple of members from this forum and it was awesome, calm waters, sun just rising, even caught a few fish (no PBs) and learnt a tonne, swapped tips on setting up milk crates etc etc... and I would love to attend more of these. However, I do understand that there are different levels of yakking experience and as a newbie I am still learning and may slow down more experienced members. Hence what I would love to gain learn is the following:-

1. What are the typical easy spots to start out at?
2. Where to get a reputable forecast information (BOM, Willy weather)
3. What data points do experienced yakers look at before they make a decision to go out
4. How do you decide what times to fish between. I have seen threads where yakkers have got stuck in the mud!
5. When you get to the water what signs do you look for to make a last go/no go decision
6. When you are on the water what are the tell tale signs to call it a day or risk getting into a spot of trouble.

The above would be a great sticky like the safety one with examples/screenshots of considerations

As the last thing I want, is have a yak that's never/hardly been out on the water and at the same time I don't want to be that guy in the news!

Stop rambling.

Cheers
Makro


I've tried to answer some of your questions here:
http://www.vyak.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=21323
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Re: read this one

Postby Rhino » 15 Oct 2015, 14:36

I've just taken a call from Transport Safety Victoria. They are very well aware of recent events, and many others that have escaped Vyak's attention.
There are things happening behind the scenes which I am not at liberty to speak about yet. Watch this space.
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